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MARYLAND HONORS JOSHUA BARNEY

War hero Commodore Joshua Barney honored at Allegheny Cemetery August 4, 2012

History buffs from Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia gathered today in Allegheny Cemetery to honor the memory of a man who was a hero during both the American Revolution and the War of 1812.

Commodore Joshua Barney, a Maryland native, died and was buried in Pittsburgh in 1818 while on route to his home in Kentucky. In 1848, his remains were moved to what was then the newly opened Allegheny Cemetery in Lawrenceville

The event, which saw the dedication of a memorial stone honoring Barney, was sponsored by Maryland chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Sons of the American Revolution and United States Daughters of 1812.

Four of Barney's descendants took part in the program, which drew about three dozen people to the Lawrenceville cemetery.Mary Jane Stockstill, an eighth-generation descendant, described Barney as "a faithful and obedient servant to our country."

Caroline Bradford, another descendant, described her ancestor's role in ordering the making of the "Star-Spangled Banner" -- with 15 stars and stripes -- that flew over Fort McHenry during the British siege of Baltimore in 1814.

Laura Smith, regent, or president, of the Pittsburgh chapter of the DAR, read a proclamation from Mayor Luke Ravenstahl declaring Aug. 4 to be "Commodore Joshua Barney Day" in the city.

The 10-by-24-inch stone marker was provided by the Col. John Eager Howard Chapter of the Maryland Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. John Eager Howard, a contemporary of Barney, was a Revolutionary War soldier who later served as a U.S. senator and governor of Maryland.


MASSACHUSETTS AUGUST 19, 2012

 

The USS Constitution is escorted by a tugboat in Boston Harbor as a crowd looks on from the shore in Boston, Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012. The USS Constitution, the U.S. Navy's oldest commissioned war ship, sailed under her own power during the event Sunday for the first time since 1997. The sail was held to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the ship's victory over HMS Guerriere in the War of 1812. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

 

US Postal Service unveils stamp of USS Constitution ship in Boston

Monday, August 20, 2012

AP Photo
This image released by the U.S. Postal Service shows a forever stamp unveiled during a ceremony in Boston Saturday, to commemorate the historic USS Constitution warship.

BOSTON (AP) - The U.S. Postal Service has introduced a stamp commemorating the world's oldest commissioned warship that's still afloat.On Saturday morning, postal officials unveiled the USS Constitution forever stamp at the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston.The stamp is the first in what officials say will be a stamp series commemorating the bicentennial of the War of 1812.Nicknamed "Old Ironsides," the ship was first launched in 1797.The stamp image is based on a painting that Michele Felice Corne did of the vessel around 1803.

NEW YORK

Welcome to
The Battle of Queenston Heights (U.S. side)
Academy Park, Lewiston, New York
October 12-14, 2012

A Bicentennial commemoration and reenactment of the first major battle of the War of 1812, portrayed on the actual dates.

This is a bi-national event with programs and demonstration on both sides of the U.S. and Canada border. This webpage is for programs on the U.S side. If you are interested in programs on the Canadian side, please click here: http://www.friendsoffortgeorge.ca/event.htm FOR MORE INFORMATION CLICK HERE

 

The grave of Moses Bacon in Union Cemtery, Albion, was decorated in ceremonies Saturday by the Niagara Chapter of the Daughters of the War of 1812. Speaking are Jeanette Brooks, left front, president of the Chapter. At right are town of Gaines historian Dee Robinson, Orleans County historian Bill Lattin and State of New York president of the Daughters of the War of 1812, Jan Johnpier. Also shown are members of the 2nd squadron 101st Cavalry of the National Guard from Niagara Falls Air Force Base, who provided an honor guard. (Virginia Kropf/Daily News)

Article from Daily News (serving Genesse, Wyoming and Orleans Counties NY) Aug 22 1812

Posted: Tuesday, August 21, 2012 12:30 am

By Virginia Kropf news@batavianews.com 
Posted: Tuesday, August 21, 2012 12:30 am

ALBION — A veteran of the War of 1812 was honored in services Saturday at his grave in Union Cemetery Moses Bacon owned the farm on Route 98, just north of Albion, where Watt Farms is now located. The cemetery is also on the property. Elfreda Stangland of Albion, a member of the Niagara Frontier Chapter of the Daughters of the War of 1812, organized the event, which began at 11 a.m. at the Cobblestone Museum in Childs. Elfreda Stangland of Albion, a member of the Niagara Frontier Chapter of the Daughters of the War of 1812, organized the event, which began at 11 a.m. at the Cobblestone Museum in Childs. 101st Cavalry from Niagara Falls Air Force Base, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance led by Jan Johnpier, president of the State of New York Society, USD of 1812. Bagpiper Mo Britt of Lockport provided patriotic music at the Cobblestone Museum and during the grave marking ceremonies which followed in the cemetery. While at the Museum, Lee Simonson, author of “Tuscarora Heroes,” presented a program on Western New York during the War of 1812. Events at the cemetery included placing a wreath on Bacon’s grave by members of Boy Scout Troop 164 of Albion, and remarks by town of Gaines historian Dee Robinson and Orleans County historian Bill Lattin. Robinson said the Watt farm was owned by Bacon and two brothers. After the war, Moses sold the east part to Hosea and the north part to Elias, reserving 100 acres for himself. Moses moved to Albion from Connecticut about 1809. He joined the war effort in 1813, and in December 1814 he participated in the battle of Fort Erie, where he was shot in the neck and captured by the British. Moses was one of 1,000 prisoners captured on the Niagara Frontier and taken to Halifax Prison, where Robinson said he was treated poorly. Men slept in four-tiered hammocks and had no shoes or jackets.

| Florida

Ring the Bells for 1812, Monday in Lake Wales
Submitted by Gay Harowe, President of the Benjamin DeVane Chapter, Floridal

: Published in the Lake Wales News 15 June, 2012


Bells will be ringing in Lake Wales on Monday to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the start of the War of 1812. Bells of the Catholic, Episcopal, Methodist and Presbyterian churches will join the Bok Tower carillon at noon to mark the occasion. “If you have a bell and would like to help remember the start of the second war for independence please join in, says Karen Wolzanski, representative with the Daughters of the American Revolution.

The War of 1812 was declared by Congress and signed into law by President James Madison on June 18, 1812. “There were many reasons for legislators to vote for the war. A well known motive was the impressment of American seamen into the Royal Navy. A more important explanation for the southern senators vote was Britain’s support of native North Americans. By creating an Indian buffer state, Britain hoped to contain American westward expansion.

Everyone knows that Francis Scott Key wrote the poem that became our national anthem during the bombardment of Fort McHenry. Did you know that he was accurately describing the attack? According to the Smithsonian Magazine, the rockets’ red glare was caused by British missiles called Congreves, which looked a bit like giant bottle rockets. They were a long stick attached to a cylindrical canister filled with gunpowder, tar and shrapnel. Congreves were inaccurate but intimidating; an 1814 version of shock and awe. The bombs bursting in air were 200 pound cannonballs, designed to explode above their target,” said Wolzanski.

The Treaty of Ghent, which ended the war, was ratified by the United States on Feb. 17, 1815. According to this treaty, neither Great Britain nor the Americans gained territory from each other. However, the United States acquired Mobile, Ala., and parts of west Florida from Spain as a result of the war.

Ring the Bells for 1812 is a nation wide program sponsored by the United States Daughters of 1812. The Benjamin DeVane Chapter is supporting the project in Polk and Hillsborough counties. For information about joining USD1812, contact Karen Wolzanski 863-692-0038.

 

 

 

Georgia

Library Displays

War of 1812 Display at the Washington Memorial Library, Genealogy Room, in Macon, GA.
Submitted by:
Judy Wall Smith, Chairman Georgia Society USD 1812 Bicentennial Committee

GEORGIA BICENTENNIAL AT FORT HAWKINS, GEORGIA June 18, 2012
LINK HERE

Program Dedication Marker Fort Hawkins by Philip Cook Chapter Georgia Society Daughters of 1812

War of 1812 Bicentennial Marker Dedication
Presiding ………………………..…..  Janet Butler Walker                                                        President Major Philip Cook Chapter
Invocation ……….………………… Judy Wall Smith                                              Chaplain Major Philip Cook Chapter
Presentation of Colors…...….. 48th Brigade Color Guard      SFC Stanley Walker, commanding
Pledge to Flag of the United States of America….. led by                                                        Charles Hampton,   Past President General Society of the War of 1812
The American’s Creed …...…..led by Dianne Cannestra, Past President State Society U.S.D. 1812
The Star Spangled Banner……..…….…… Marty Willett Fort Hawkins Commission, Project Coordinator
Opening Remarks…….……….…… Janet Butler Walker                                                 
Introduction of Honored Guests….……………………….. Janet Butler Walker
Greetings from the Fort Hawkins Commission………… Judy Wall Smith, Commission Vice-Chairman
Greetings from the State Society U.S.D. 1812……..……... Ann Williams, State President
Read Proclamation……...………………..Robert Reichert  Mayor, City of Macon                                               
Introduction of Speaker ….……...………... Marty Willett
“Fort Hawkins and the War of 1812”…….… Dan Elliott
Dedication Ceremony
President: Daughters and guests, we have come to this place to honor the memory of our beloved ancestors whose valor we will never forget.
Chaplain:  Hear, O Lord, give ear to understanding. All   ye that worship the Lord, Praise Him and giv Him thanks.
President:  Praise the Lord so that He shall receive great honor, and an everlasting name.
Chaplain:  O give thanks unto the Lord, because His is  gracious and His mercy endureth forever.
Response:  God is our Sun and Shield, our Light and  our Defense.
Chaplain:   Peace like a river from His throne shall flow  to nations yet unknown. The peace of God which passeth all understanding shall keep your hearts and minds, through Jesus Christ.
Response:  For it is better for us to die in battle than to   behold the calamities of our people and our              sanctuary.
Chaplain:  God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.
Response:  One generation passeth away, another  cometh, but the earth abideth forever.
Chaplain – A Prayer:   O Eternal God, Creator and        Preserver of Nations, we bow in humble thanksgiving for the preservation of our beloved            country, grant, we beseech Thee, that the United        
States Daughters of 1812 gathered here shall bear in mind the noble service which our forefathers gave to these United States. Make us ever mindful of our obligations to them and to all mankind. Direct us this day in all our doing and          give us grace to be wise and just, and to further Thy cause of Peace, Charity and Good Will to all nations. We ask this in Christ’s name.
Amen

Unveiling of marker ……………………………………                 Janet Butler Walker and  Judy Wall Smith
Benediction ……………………………  Judy Wall Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


    National Society
     United States Daughters of 1812
      Major Philip Cook Chapter
     and
      The Fort Hawkins Commission

Bicentennial Marker Dedication

Fort Hawkins                                Macon, Georgia                                June

 

10 ways to commemorate the War of 1812

Statewide events recall Maryland's pivotal role in the War of 1812

1812 Commemoration

Fort McHenry Guards marched in the colors at the beginning of the ceremony to announce the Star-Spangled Sailabration. (Kenneth K. Lam, Baltimore Sun / June 14, 2012)


 

NEW YORK

Oswego Dedicates Its Peace Garden

Posted on June 17, 2012 by REPORT FROM General Jacob Brown Chapter, Beverly Sterling-Affinati

OSWEGO, NY – Nearly 80 people showed up Saturday afternoon in Leotta Park along East First Street to officially dedicate Oswego’s Peace Garden.

The 15-star and 15-stripe, 1812 flag

The 15-star and 15-stripe, 1812 flag

A huge American Flag, with 15 stripes, fluttered in the breeze.

“This is the only (US) flag with 15 stripes,” Tony Leotta pointed out. “The 14th and 15th stripes represent Vermont and Kentucky. This flag was used until, I think, 1822. When the other states were added, they realized they couldn’t add a stripe for every new state. So, they returned to the 13 stripes and added stars instead.”

The garden was originally developed in 2003 by Leotta, the city engineer, and the Jay Saternow family, and several volunteers from the community.

Mayor Tom Gillen chats with Joyce Lorraine, USA project manager of the International Peace Garden Foundation, center and Paula Savage, president of the group, prior to the ceremony.

Mayor Tom Gillen chats with Joyce Lorraine, USA project manager of the International Peace Garden Foundation, center, and Paula Savage, president of the group, prior to the ceremony.

“It was named a ‘Peace Garden’ by the late Frank Clavelli Sr., former member of the Oswego Common Council,” Leotta pointed out.

He and the city’s Department of Public Works along with a group of volunteers have cared for and maintained the garden for the past several years.

The oval-shaped garden was recently expanded and planted with a colorful assortment of marigolds, zinnias, cannis and geraniums.

The 15-star and 15-stripe, 1812 flag has been ordered to fly over the garden.

New signage will be installed to identify the garden as an official site of the War of 1812 Bicentennial Peace Garden Trail.

Sophie DeCaire shows her disdain at being told she can't pick any flowers from the Peace Garden.

Sophie DeCaire shows her disdain at being told she can't pick any flowers from the Peace Garden.

The garden route covers more than 600 miles in the U.S. and Canada and includes 17 peace gardens in communities where events took place during the War of 1812.

Joyce Lorraine, USA project manager of the International Peace Garden Foundation, said the first gardens were in recognition of sharing the longest undefended border in the world since the War of 1812.

“Since then, these peace gardens have been going around the world, from country to country,” she said.

Paula Savage, president of the organization added it was originally “only going to be three or four gardens along the Niagara River on the Canadian and on the American side.”

But, she said, there is a lot more to the War of 1812 than just the Niagara River. And so, it became a much larger project.

“We want to embrace all the historic areas,” she told Oswego County Today. “So that is when we started calling all the tourism directors together across the state. The war really had a big impact on the whole eastern part of the country.”

Legislator Louella LeClair presents the city with a county flag. Holding the flag are Mayor Tom Gillen and Mercedes Niess, director of the H. Lee White Marine Museum.

Legislator Louella LeClair presents the city with a county flag. Holding the flag are Mayor Tom Gillen and Mercedes Niess, director of the H. Lee White Marine Museum.

“We’re celebrating 200 years of peace between the United States and Canada,” Savage noted.

The program has been honored by the United Nations “for fostering world peace.”

Mayor Tom Gillen said he was honored to have the Peace Garden in the Port City. He praised all of the dozens of volunteers who made it a reality; especially Leotta, one of the driving forces behind the creation of the garden.

“There’s a lot of Tony in this garden,” the mayor said. “It celebrates our relationship with Canada.”

Paul Lear

Paul Lear

The garden is actually situated within the confines of Leotta Park. The plaque designating the park area is still in the mayor’s office, Leotta pointed out. It will be erected “at the proper time,” he said modestly.

Paul Lear, superintendent of Fort Ontario State Historic Site, said Oswego was an important military site during the War of 1812, sometimes referred to as the second war for independence.

He provided the large crowd with a brief look at Oswego’s significance during the war.

There were two battles here, one in 1813 and the other in 1814.

Beverly Sterling-Affinati

Beverly Sterling-Affinati

“On May 5 -7, 1814, British land and naval forces conducted an amphibious assault on Fort Ontario and the village of Oswego. Lt. Col. George Mitchell, commanding 290 men of the 3rd U.S. Artillery Regiment and a Light Artillery company, 20 sailors from the USS Growler and local militia, fought off one landing attempt and stubbornly resisted a second and final successful British attack before retreating to Oswego Falls,” he said.

Although Fort Ontario was ultimately destroyed and Oswego captured, the British soon left. Mitchell’s delaying tactics had provided time to remove vital naval stores and supplies upriver to Oswego Falls (now Fulton).

Mercedes Niess

Mercedes Niess

Within a few weeks, ropes, rigging, sails, cannon, powder, and other supplies began flowing again through Oswego to Sackets Harbor. The U.S. Navy was able to maintain pace with British shipbuilders in Kingston, Ontario, in the struggle for naval control of Lake Ontario because of Mitchell’s defense of Oswego.

Legislator Louella LeClair presented the city with a flag to fly over the park and garden site.

“May God grant our county and country peace,” she said.

Savage gave the crowd an overview of the International Peace Garden Foundation.

“The garden is a tangible part of this friendship (between nations). Annually, a new country is nominated by the previous recipient country,” she explained. “We are completely volunteer.”

The Peace Garden idea was expanded to involve all areas that had an historic significance relating to the war.

Mayor Tom Gillen

Mayor Tom Gillen

Today there are 18 bicentennial Peace Gardens along the trail in New York alone. Four more are currently being developed.

These gardens are a place to enjoy the fragrance of the flowers, Savage said, “But, also they have a much greater meaning.”

They also foster partnerships, promote community pride and volunteerism and more, she said.

She encouraged people to “enjoy them, visit them, help maintain them and brag to your out-of-town family and friends about them.”

Beverly Sterling-Affinati, chair of the US Daughters of 1812 Bicentennial, said by dedicating the garden “we are passing our heritage on to future generations.”

Paula Savage

Paula Savage

“If you do only one thing when you leave here to day, please remember – remember there was a War of 1812, that it was significant and it was significant because that war cost men their lives! Mothers lost sons, wives lost husbands, girlfriends lost boyfriends,” she said. “As time passes and new generations take the place of older generations, it is easy to forget that they, like you and I, were once real people with real loved ones and real families. It’s easy to forget that any time our lives and communities are disrupted by a war; it costs all of us something. Some kind of sacrifice has to be made and generally that sacrifice is paid for in the way of lives.”

Mercedes Niess, director of the H. Lee White Marine Museum, represented the Great Lakes Seaway Trail.

Some flowers in Oswego's Peace Garden

Some flowers in Oswego's Peace Garden

“Later this year, the H. Lee White Marine Museum will host the new Great Lakes Seaway Trail War of 1812 traveling exhibit,” she said.

“We part of this network, the international peace gardens,” Mary Vanouse, community development director, noted. “The significance of this park is that it is such a key battle area.”

There have been many donations that have helped make the park and the garden a reality, she said.

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TEXAS Library Display

Placed in Temple, Texas Public Library, Penny Worley, Jordan Bass Chapter.

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Copyright 2012