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STATE REPORTS 2013-2014

CALIFORNIA -COLORADO-CONNECTICUT

 

Rosemead War of 1812 Patriots remembered (From Pasadena-Star News, October 23, 1813)

Wreaths are laid at the graves of two War of 1812 Patriots during a War of 1812 Commemoration Service at Savannah Memorial Park in Rosemead on Wednesday October 23, 2013. The Joel Brigham Chapter of the National Society United States Daughters of 1812 host the wreath-laying ceremony at the graves of two of Los Angeles County’s veteran soldiers, John Holt (1792-1872) and Wiley Richie Wilson (1800-1878), who served in the War of 1812.

CLICK HERE to see Photos of Grave Marking.

Saluting Memory of War of 1812 Veterans

By Shel Segal Published in SGV West Valley Journal
In honor of the bicentennial of the War of 1812, Savannah Memorial Cemetery held a wreath-laying ceremony on
Wednesday for two veterans of the conflict.

Descendants of one of the men looked on as ceremonies were conducted at the historic cemetery at the juncture of Rosmeead and El Monte.

Anne Scholz, president of Joel Brigham Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of 1812, said activities like this are beginning to happen across the Golden State as veterans John Holt and Wiley Wilson were honored.

“This is the bicentennial of the War of 1812, so we are locating patriots of the war who are buried in California,” Scholz said. “We have discovered these two gentlemen who are buried in Savannah Memorial Cemetery. We are having a rededication ceremony for these two gentlemen.”

Scholz said, however, there are not that many known veterans buried here in California.

“To date we have 12,” she said. “That’s not very many, but think about the time they came. They did it by way of land grants, for the most part.”
She added these are veterans who should not be forgotten.

“We have been researching these gentlemen to find some living descendants here in California,” she said. “Fortunately, we have been able to find several from at least one of the families. Everybody has been just so supportive. It is the bicentennial year. They served our country.”

Ventura resident Janet Page Matheny – a descendant of Wilson – was on hand for the ceremony. She said she is very happy to have been able to attend.

“I’m extremely proud of this,” said Matheny, adding Wilson was her third great grandfather. “I’m a descendant of Wiley’s oldest son. He had something like 10 or 12 children. There are a number of us. A few years back in doing my family history I made contact with a distant cousin in Tennessee. She indicated to me our family was buried here.”

As she grew up in Rosemead, she said she never visited Wilson’s gravesite as she didn’t even know about the cemetery.

“I could have walked here, but I never knew about this,” she said.

Matheny added she is thrilled to know about her relative’s military service.

“To find he served in the War of 1812, that’s just incredible,” she said. “I’m just blown away that as a young man he served. He lost his father very young and had a widowed mother. That was a big sacrifice.”
(Shel Segal can be reached at \n ssegal@sgvjournal.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .)

 

COLORADO

Colorado PR Chairman Colleen Joyce

The pictures attached to this email are of the “Ringing the Bells” ceremony held Evergreen, CO. 

Colorado State Society, N.S.U.S.D 1812 commemorated the beginning of the War of 1812 by ringing the bell at the historic landmark Church of the Transfiguration in Evergreen, CO.  In attendance were Colorado State President, Colleen Joyce; Colorado State Historian Suzanne Smith, Colorado State Corresponding Secretary, Susan Grover and members of Colorado State Society and the Mountain Rendezvous Chapter, NSDAR.  The State Historian presented a program on the lasting impact of the war followed by a tour of the church’s campus and lunch in downtown Evergreen.

Picture 455 – Top row:  L-R –Alice Thompson, Mary Peabody; Susan Grover, State Corresponding Secretary; Colleen Joyce, Colorado State President; Suzie White.
Bottom Row: Joella Borchelt; Suzann Smith, State Historian; Paula Lasky and Marlene Waltz

COLORADO PR REPORT 2013-2014. Click Here

CONNECTICUT

Towns remember devastating British attack, response in 'Light Up the Night'

ATTACK ON THE TOWN OF ESSEX, CONNECTICUT COMMEMORATED

By Kimberly Drelich

Publication: The Day

Published 04/09/2014 12:00 AM
Updated 04/09/2014 11:55 PM

For more information and complete article Click HERE

 

Betty Oderwald, of Fairfield, president of the Connecticut State Society, U.S. Daughters of 1812, and her grandson Alex Kimble, 13, of Newtown, stand in front of a musket that belonged to Ephraim Chamberlain of Westford, Mass., on display Wednesday at the Old Academy on the Fairfield's Town Hall Green. Oderwald said the musket bore no gunsmith markings because if such a weapon had fallen into British hands the gunsmith would have been tracked down and killed. Photo: Meg Barone / Fairfield Citizen freelance. From the Fairfield Citizen July 07, 1812

Connor Frawley leads the procession of colors Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the 119th annual Independence Day Celebration at Town Hall in Fairfield, Conn. Photo: Autumn Driscoll / Connecticut Post

Connor Frawley leads the procession of colors Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the 119th annual Independence Day Celebration at Town Hall in Fairfield, Conn. Photo: Autumn Driscoll / Connecticut Post

Max Rein, representing Thomas Jefferson, reads from the Declaration of Independence Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the 119th annual Independence Day Celebration at Town Hall in Fairfield, Conn. Photo: Autumn Driscoll / Connecticut Post

Max Rein, representing Thomas Jefferson, reads from the Declaration of Independence Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the 119th annual Independence Day Celebration at Town Hall in Fairfield, Conn. Photo: Autumn Driscoll / Connecticut Post

Betty Oderwald, president of the Connecticut State Society of the U.S. Daughters of 1812, speaks Wednesday, July 4, 2012 during the 119th annual Independence Day Celebration at Town Hall in Fairfield, Conn. Photo: Autumn Driscoll / Connecticut Post

Betty Oderwald, president of the Connecticut State Society of the U.S. Daughters of 1812, speaks Wednesday, July 4, 2012 during the 119th annual Independence Day Celebration at Town Hall in Fairfield, Conn. Photo: Autumn Driscoll / Connecticut Post.

"We hold these truths to be self-evident ..."

The words reverberated across historic Town Hall Green on Wednesday morning -- and across the centuries -- as the town celebrated Independence Day in keeping with local tradition.

The 119th annual Independence Day salute featured patriotic songs sung by Sophia Filan, fife-and-drum music from the Spirit of 1776, speeches about Fairfield's role in the history of the United States, and three young men dressed in Colonial-era garb who took turns reading from the Declaration of Independence.

Max Rein represented Thomas Jefferson, Dylan Levinson embodied John Adams and Sam Jones portrayed Benjamin Franklin. After reading the document, which declared America's independence from Great Britain, Rein, Levinson and Jones read the names of each of the document's signers.

"When you visit other towns around this great country of ours you realize they all weren't here in 1776 ... They all weren't around in 1812 when we fought for independence the second time. Our town has been an integral part of our (nation's) history since the very beginning," said First Selectman Michael Tetreau.

He asked the crowd of about 100 people to respect and honor the military veterans who kept their freedoms intact and those who continue to fight for those freedoms today. "Don't miss an opportunity to tell them, `Thank you.' We are here today and we can be here today because of their sacrifices, their efforts, their fighting on our behalf," the first selectman said.

Tetreau thanked members of local chapters of the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and Daughters of the American Revolution for hosting the annual celebration "and making the Fourth of July live for us to be more than just fireworks, hotdogs and hamburgers, but to be a real part of who we are and help us remember how we got here."

Betty Oderwald, a Fairfielders who is president of the Connecticut State Society U.S. Daughters of 1812, reminded the crowd that Benjamin Franklin said after the Revolutionary War that the war of independence was yet to be fought.

"The War of 1812 was that war of independence," she said of the military action that celebrates its bicentennial this year. "It was the war that established the United States as a nation able to negotiate the quagmire of European politics and bring England to a peace that sacrificed no American territory ... It was the foundation to create a nation from sea to shining sea," she said.

Oderwald highlighted the roles of some local residents who contributed to the fight and helped the nation achieve its freedom, among them Caleb Brewster, Commodore Isaac Chauncy, Captain Peter Burr, Levi Jennings and Roger Minot Sherman, nephew to Roger Sherman, the only man to sign all four documents of the Revolution, including the Declaration of Independence. She referred to the War of 1812 and the men who fought as "the forgotten war, the forgotten veterans."

Oderwald also talked about the historic Powder House off Unquowa Road, a "Fairfield treasure," which is the only remaining powder house in the state of Connecticut built for the War of 1812 and still standing.

Many in the crowd wore red, white and blue, including Len Paoletta of Easton and a former Bridgeport mayor, whose shirt depicted an American flag and the Statue of Liberty. "I wear this shirt three times a year. It's very patriotic," said Paoletta, who took several of his grandchildren with him to the Fairfield celebration.

"I was looking for something appropriate to the day, something that represents the meaning of the day, and we thought this was it," he told the Fairfield Citizen, bemoaning the fact that too many people use the holiday for shopping, picnics and fireworks. "Freedom is not free," he said. Paoletta said he hopes future generations hold on to the true meaning of July 4th.

The sentiment was not lost on some of the young people who participated or attended. Jasmine White, 8, of Roswell, Ga., visiting her grandmother Sue Noyes of Fairfield, said she thought the program was instructive. "I got to learn more about history," Jasmine said.

Lily Phillips, 9, of Fairfield, carried the American flag in the Procession of the Colors. "I really enjoyed when they read the Declaration of Independence. It felt so real with them being in costume. It kind of felt like I was in town for the actual reading of the Declaration of Independence with the bells ringing," said Lily, a member of the Children of the American Revolution.

Her mother, Robin Phillips, assistant vice regent of the local DAR chapter, said she was pleased young people were able to get a sense of why the Revolutionary War and War of 1812 were fought and why people continue to celebrate the Fourth of July each year.

"It's more about the birth of American freedom than fireworks and hotdogs," she said.

NEWSLETTER CONNECTICUT HERITAGE SOCIETY FALL, 2012 CLICK HERE

 

 

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