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ALABAMA

Alabama Society President shown here with Fort Mims Marker
(Photo Courtesy of Rita Reid, State Historian)

ARKANSAS NEWS 2013

ARKANSAS NEWSLETTER JUNE 2013

Ladies, U.S.D. 1812 was honored to be present when CPL Marvin E. Omans, USA Korean War Veteran, was returned home after 63 years of Missing In Action.  CPL Omans, Company I, 3rd Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, US Army was lost on 3 December 1950 near Sinhung-ri, North Korea.  He was accounted for on 21 May 2013.  He was returned home on June 21st and his funeral was held the following Monday.  Thank you Kay Tatum and Mary Ellen Laursen for attending his funeral.  CPL Omans was met at the airport by his sister, nephew & wife, and great nieces & nephews.  His sister, who was 24 years old when he was reported missing, thanked us over and over for being there.  It was our honor.

            In late November 1950, Omans and elements of the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT) were deployed along the east side of the Chosin Reservoir near P’ungnyuri Inlet, in North Korea, when the unit was attacked by overwhelming enemy forces. On Dec. 1, 1950, remnants of the 31st RCT, known historically as Task Force Faith, began a fighting withdrawal to a more defensible position near Hagaru-ri, south of the reservoir. On Dec. 3, 1950, enemy forces attacked a defensive perimeter established by the 31st RCT. It was during this attack that Omans was reported missing.

            Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea gave the United States 208 boxes believed to contain the remains of 200-400 U.S. service members. North Korean documents, turned over with some of the boxes, indicated that some of the human remains were recovered from the area where Omans was last seen.

            In the identification of Oman’s remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence, compiled by DPMO and JPAC researchers, and forensic identification tools, such as mitochondrial DNA-which matched Omans' sister and nephew.  Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials. More than 7,900 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

 

The two Arkansas chapters presented JROTC medals this year.  Medals were presented to Catholic High, Hope High, Hot Springs High, Arkadelphia High, Malvern High, Watson Chapel High and White Hall High Schools.

Arkadelphia High School JROTC Cadet Sierra Adams

 Mary Ellen Laursen, me, Malvern High School JROTC Cadet Tasheauna Cooper, Col. Daniel

ARKANSAS 1812 BROCHURE

Motto: Liberty, Fraternity, and Unity
Flower: White Carnation
Colors: Blue and Gray
Emblem: Star and Anchor
National Headquarters
National Society
United States Daughters of 1812
1461 Rhode Island Avenue N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005
Telephone: 202-745-1812
Website: http://www.usdaughters1812.org

Mount Holly Cemetery, Little Rock

The Arkansas State Society USD1812 was organized 4 April 1906 in Little Rock.  Past Chapters include:
Nicholas Headington Chapter, LR - 1908
John Craig Dodd Chapter, Batesville - 1910
Simon Bradford Chapter, Pine Bluff - 1911
Chalmette Chapter, Texarkana - 1913
Gen. George Izard Chapter, LR - 1923
Gen. James Miller Chapter, Helena – ca 1928
Joseph Pollard Chapter, Hot Springs – ca 1927
Light Horse Harry Lee Chapter
Edward Brooking Broadnax, Monticello
El Dorado Chapter, El Dorado - 1928
Robert S. Cannon Chapter, Beebe – 1929
Gen. Samuel Connor Chapter, Conway – 1930

With the exception of the Simon Bradford Chapter, none of the chapters are in existence today.  However, in 1995, the Baseline-Meridian Chapter was organized in Little Rock.

Description: http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT-HSuHAZ21qdikZKUEdhqB2BrB3zo7sfOs_WNczDXSkeBqD_E_

Arkansas State Society
United States Daughters of 1812
Website:
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~arsd1812/arkansas1812
Sheila Beatty – State President
27 Doblez Circle
Hot Springs Village, AR  71909
beattykrout@suddenlink.net

Baseline-Meridian Chapter – Little Rock
Sylvia Matthews – Chapter President
10 Loyola Lane
Hot Springs Village, AR  71909
hotexans@suddenlink.net

Simon Bradford Chapter – Pine Bluff
Susan Railsback – Chapter President
514 West 36th Street
Pine Bluff, AR  71603
scrard@cablelynx.com


PURPOSES
The purposes of the United States Daughters of 1812 shall be to promote patriotism, to preserve and increase knowledge of the history of the American people by the preservation of documents and relics, the marking of historic spots, the recording of family histories and traditions, the celebration of patriotic anniversaries, teaching and emphasizing the heroic deeds of the civil, military and naval life of those who molded this Government between the close of the American Revolution and the close of the War of 1812, to urge Congress to compile and publish authentic records of men in civil, military and naval service from 1784 to 1815 inclusive and to maintain at National Headquarters, a museum and library of memorabilia of the 1784-1815 period.

INSIGNIA
The insignia of the Society is of gold with blue
enamel and represents a single star resting upon an anchor encircled with a narrow gold band—The Star of Hope upon the anchor of Faith within the Circle of Friendship. The center of the star has “U.S.D.1812” on it. The insignia is suspended by a blue and gray ribbon from a bar pin. The blue represents the color worn by the Navy during the War of 1812 and the gray represents the color worn by the army.

HISTORY
The National Society United States Daughters of
1812 was organized on January 8, 1892 by the
founder and first president, Mrs. Flora Adams
Darling. The organizing president was Mrs. William Gerry Slade who was president for eighteen years, 1897-1915. The first publication of the Society was reprinted in the December 1936 issue of the News-Letter. It sets forth the purpose and spirit of the society. Regulations of the Society are set up in conformity with the period of our national history from its inception
as a republic in 1784 through the War of 1812. On 25 February,1901, the Society was incorporated by an Act of the Fifty-Sixth Congress ( Session II, Chapter 472) and approved by President William McKinley as the National Society United States Daughter of Eighteen Hundred and Twelve. This was one of the first woman’s organizations to receive such
a national charter. At the close of the administration of Mrs. William Gerry Slade in 1915, thirty-five state societies had been organized with an enrollment of 3,758 members.

ELIGIBILITY FOR MEMBERSHIP
Admission to membership in the National Society is by invitation after an affirmative vote by the chapter or state society. Applicants shall have the endorsement of two members in good standing to whom the applicant is personally known.

Membership is available to women age eighteen and over who can offer satisfactory proof that they are lineal descendants of an ancestor who, during the period of 1784-1815 inclusive, rendered civil, military, or naval service to our country, rendered material aid to the U.S. Army or Navy, or who participated in the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Junior membership is available to girls and boys from birth through age 21. Young women between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five are known as Flora Adams Darling Daughters in honor of the Society's first president.

Service may be, but not limited to the following:
a. Those who signed the Oath of Allegiance or the Loyalty Test.
b. All state, county and town officials and also jurors.
c. A member of the Continental or Federal Congress, or a member of a State Assembly or Legislature of one of the first eighteen states.
d. A delegate to the convention which framed The Constitution of the United States.
e. A member of a State Convention which ratified The Constitution of the United States.
f. An elector of one of the first four Presidents of
the United States.
g. A legislative, executive or judicial officer of the
United States of America, including such appointive officers as Treaty Commissioners, Territorial Officers, etc.
Military or Naval Service in any of the following insurrections or wars:
1. Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, 1784-1787. (A local disturbance between settlers from Connecticut and Pennsylvania in said valley.)
2. Shay’s Rebellion, Massachusetts, 1786-1787.
(Local, grew out of burdensome taxation. Confined to and suppressed by militia of the State of Massachusetts.)
3. Wars with Indians, 1784-1815.
4. Whiskey Insurrection, Pennsylvania, 1794.
(Local, arose in consequence of certain taxes on
domestic spirits. Suppressed by the authority of the United States.)
5. War with France (Undeclared), 1798-1800.
(Naval, carried on by the United States through its Navy and privateers.)
6. Sabine Expedition, Louisiana, 1806.
7. Attack of British warship Leopard upon the
United States frigate Chesapeake. (Disturbance growing out of attack of the British warship Leopard on the American frigate Chesapeake, as the result of the British claim to the right to search. The attack occurred at sea off Hampton Roads, Virginia. The militia was called out by the authority of the President.)
8. Embargo troubles, - Lake Champlain, 1808.
9. Altercation between United States frigate President and the British ship Little Belt. (An engagement on the Atlantic, off the southern coast of the United States, resulting from the British claim of right to search.)

10. Expedition against Lafitte Pirates, 1814. (Local, conducted by the authority of the United States.).
11. Wars with the Barbary Powers, 1801-5 and
1815. (Conducted by the authority of the United
States through its Navy on the northern coast of
Africa.)
12. War with Great Britain, 1812-1815. (General,
covering nearly the entire territory of the United
States, especially the seaboard.)
13. The Creek War, 4 October 1814 to 24 January 1815. (Local, but conducted by the authority of the United States.)
14. Lafitte Aides to General Andrew Jackson.
15. Local or state militia service, 1784-1815, or
giving material aid to the Army and Navy.
16. Member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition,
1804-6. (Military exploring expedition to find land
route to the Pacific Ocean.)

 

PURPOSES
The purposes of the United States Daughters of 1812 shall be to promote patriotism, to preserve and increase knowledge of the history of the American people by the preservation of documents and relics, the marking of historic spots, the recording of family histories and traditions, the celebration of patriotic anniversaries, teaching and emphasizing the heroic deeds of the civil, military and naval life of those who molded this Government between the close of the American Revolution and the close of the War of 1812, to urge Congress to compile and publish authentic records of men in civil, military and naval service from 1784 to 1815 inclusive and to maintain at National Headquarters, a museum and library of memorabilia of the 1784-1815 period.

INSIGNIA
The insignia of the Society is of gold with blue
enamel and represents a single star resting upon an anchor encircled with a narrow gold band—The Star of Hope upon the anchor of Faith within the Circle of Friendship. The center of the star has “U.S.D.1812” on it. The insignia is suspended by a blue and gray ribbon from a bar pin. The blue represents the color worn by the Navy during the War of 1812 and the gray represents the color worn by the army.

HISTORY
The National Society United States Daughters of
1812 was organized on January 8, 1892 by the
founder and first president, Mrs. Flora Adams
Darling. The organizing president was Mrs. William Gerry Slade who was president for eighteen years, 1897-1915. The first publication of the Society was reprinted in the December 1936 issue of the News-Letter. It sets forth the purpose and spirit of the society. Regulations of the Society are set up in conformity with the period of our national history from its inception
as a republic in 1784 through the War of 1812. On 25 February,1901, the Society was incorporated by an Act of the Fifty-Sixth Congress ( Session II, Chapter 472) and approved by President William McKinley as the National Society United States Daughter of Eighteen Hundred and Twelve. This was one of the first woman’s organizations to receive such
a national charter. At the close of the administration of Mrs. William Gerry Slade in 1915, thirty-five state societies had been organized with an enrollment of 3,758 members.

ELIGIBILITY FOR MEMBERSHIP
Admission to membership in the National Society is by invitation after an affirmative vote by the chapter or state society. Applicants shall have the endorsement of two members in good standing to whom the applicant is personally known.

Membership is available to women age eighteen and over who can offer satisfactory proof that they are lineal descendants of an ancestor who, during the period of 1784-1815 inclusive, rendered civil, military, or naval service to our country, rendered material aid to the U.S. Army or Navy, or who participated in the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Junior membership is available to girls and boys from birth through age 21. Young women between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five are known as Flora Adams Darling Daughters in honor of the Society's first president.

Service may be, but not limited to the following:
a. Those who signed the Oath of Allegiance or the Loyalty Test.
b. All state, county and town officials and also jurors.
c. A member of the Continental or Federal Congress, or a member of a State Assembly or Legislature of one of the first eighteen states.
d. A delegate to the convention which framed The Constitution of the United States.
e. A member of a State Convention which ratified The Constitution of the United States.
f. An elector of one of the first four Presidents of
the United States.
g. A legislative, executive or judicial officer of the
United States of America, including such appointive officers as Treaty Commissioners, Territorial Officers, etc.
Military or Naval Service in any of the following insurrections or wars:
1. Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, 1784-1787. (A local disturbance between settlers from Connecticut and Pennsylvania in said valley.)
2. Shay’s Rebellion, Massachusetts, 1786-1787.
(Local, grew out of burdensome taxation. Confined to and suppressed by militia of the State of Massachusetts.)
3. Wars with Indians, 1784-1815.
4. Whiskey Insurrection, Pennsylvania, 1794.
(Local, arose in consequence of certain taxes on
domestic spirits. Suppressed by the authority of the United States.)
5. War with France (Undeclared), 1798-1800.
(Naval, carried on by the United States through its Navy and privateers.)
6. Sabine Expedition, Louisiana, 1806.
7. Attack of British warship Leopard upon the
United States frigate Chesapeake. (Disturbance growing out of attack of the British warship Leopard on the American frigate Chesapeake, as the result of the British claim to the right to search. The attack occurred at sea off Hampton Roads, Virginia. The militia was called out by the authority of the President.)
8. Embargo troubles, - Lake Champlain, 1808.
9. Altercation between United States frigate President and the British ship Little Belt. (An engagement on the Atlantic, off the southern coast of the United States, resulting from the British claim of right to search.)

NEWSLETTER

Dear Arkansas Daughters:

An update of our activities since my last newsletter:

Grave Locations/Dedications: The number of 1812 Veterans has increased and we now have identified, if not located, 322 buried in Arkansas. Pending member Nancy Holder has been working diligently with the Veterans Administration in securing tombstones for Veterans who have none. She is currently working with member Cheri Coley in securing a tombstone for Cheri’s ancestor James Downum, buried in Springdale. As soon as possible, after the stone has been received and placed, we will schedule a dedication ceremony. We will also be scheduling more dedications later in the year (when it cools down). One of those is Linda Thomas’ ancestor, William Crowson. These dedications will be publicized as much as possible in order to bring awareness of U.S.D. 1812 and the Bicentennial.

Publicity: Both chapters are encouraged to publicize, publicize, publicize. I need 4 copies of any articles appearing in the papers – so please send. Thank you. Arkansas also now has its own Arkansas U.S.D. 1812 brochure. I will be bringing a few to the chapters in August. Chapters are asked to distribute to their libraries, genealogy/historical societies, workshops, etc. I have attached to this email.

Yearbook: The 2012-2015 yearbook for both chapters and the state society is at the printers. Please note that the chapter and state by-laws are outdated and will be revised. I will bring the yearbook to the first meeting of both chapters. The correct State and National dues and fees are on a separate page. Thanks to Jeanette Frahm for compiling/typing it and finding the least expensive printer. Each chapter is responsible for the cost ($2.00 per yearbook).

Membership: Hopefully with the increased publicity we will see an increase in our membership. New members who are admitted to the Arkansas Society between June 18, 2012 and February 17, 2015 will be known as Bicentennial Members in Arkansas and will receive a certificate, suitable for framing, identifying them as such. So, this is the time to get your daughters, granddaughters, mothers, aunts, grandmothers and friends into the Society. Remember, our number #1 priority is to honor and remember the Veterans and Patriots who sacrificed for the young nation known as the United States of America. We need new members to help us accomplish this and to keep our society strong. I am challenging each chapter to a 50% growth over the next 3 years. Bring in those Bicentennial Members!

Fundraising: The goal of marking and dedicating of 1812 Veterans’ graves is expensive. As I have discussed before we need revenue to accomplish it. I will be attending both chapters’ August meetings and will be bringing with me Pamela Wright’s U.S.D. 1812 broach. It sells on her website for $10.00 and with shipping at $9.85 it is $19.85. I will be selling it for $20.00 – so bring your wallets. Due to the quantity ordered, the shipping is less so we will be able to make a slight profit. Every 3 sold will pay for 1 marker. The broach is very attractive:

I will also take orders for another Pamela Wright broach/slide: It sells on her site for $35.00 plus $9.85 shipping. I will purchase for you and charge $50.00. Again, the proceeds to help defray the cost of the grave markings.

If you have ideas for other fundraisers, please advise. I know that other groups have had success with a “No Bake” Bake Sale.

Arkansas and Chapter’s Histories: I have visited again the Arkansas History Commission trying to learn as much about our history as I can. Since the records are in the Manuscript Division, I can take no copying device (such as a camera or portable scanner) into the room. The only material I am allowed to take is a pencil and a notepad. There is little there though: The original charters for 4 chapters and the application papers for the first 103 members in Arkansas; also a scrapbook of the Nicholas Headington Chapter. The material cannot be copied on a standard copying machine. I have sent a formal request into the Commission asking for an exception to the rules. I have been able to purchase more National yearbooks off of Ebay that has helped also. I am still requesting from you state/national yearbooks, scrapbooks, anything, to help rebuild/rediscover our history. If you are in doubt that what you have I need, just email or call me. I will return to you – just write your name on it. I have discovered that the ladies who preceded us worked very hard to honor our ancestors and the 1812 era history. We cannot let that work just be forgotten. Thank you.

Baseline-Meridian extends an invitation to their August 1 meeting that will be held at the Arkansas Arts Center. They will be installing new Chapter officers: President- Sylvia Matthews; Vice President- Peggy Vandenberg; Chaplain- Nell White; Secretary- Frankie Ochsner; Treasurer- Mary Reid Warner; Registrar- Jeanette Frahm; Historian/Curator/Librarian- Linda Thomas. Contact Linda Thomas by July 25 if you will be attending.

I know this is a long letter, but I wanted to keep you all informed as to our activities.

Chapter Presidents: Please distribute to members without email. Thank you.

In your service,

Sheila

President Arkansas Society U.S.D. 1812

And for your reading pleasure

From http://war1812trails.com/Bicentennial%20Articles%20.htm

June 97, 2012 Article Washington Post entitled:

THE WAR OF 1812, STILL SEEKING A LITTLE RESPECT

You will be forgiven for not noticing that the bicentennial of the War of 1812 is nearing full swing. No such dispensation could be granted for the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, of course, as it is impossible to miss the armies of re-enactors, the newspaper special sections, the magazine covers, the Civil War travel packages — all this, even though sesquicentennial has none of the zing of bicentennial. Other anniversaries are much in the news. It gets no respect, this Rodney Dangerfield of American wars.

Some 36 percent of Americans say there were no significant outcomes to the War of 1812, or if there were any, they could not name them, according to a recent poll by the Canadian research firm “Ipsos Reid for the Historica-Dominion Institute.” While 17 percent of Canadians consider the War of 1812 the most important war in the formation of their nation’s identity, only 3 percent of Americans feel the same way. (True, Americans have a lot more wars to choose from than Canadians.) Historians duel over which deserves the title of most obscure major American war, Korea or 1812. Clay Blair titled his fine 1987 history of Korea “The Forgotten War”; Donald Hickey, one of 1812’s foremost scholars, countered two years later with “The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict.” (J. MacKay Hitsman named his book “The Incredible War of 1812,” but he was Canadian.)

Updated March 01, 2012

 

 

 

 

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Copyright 2012