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WAR OF 1812 VETERANS GRAVES MARKED

ARKANSAS:
Mark your calendars:  On Saturday, October 6th, at 2:30 p.m., Baseline-Meridian will be conducting a grave-marking  and dedication for William Miller Crowson, ancestor of Linda Thomas.  Linda has worked hard on this marking/dedication and advised that she has family coming in for the event from three states:  Georgia, Texas and Oklahoma.   Members from both chapters are asked to attend.  Ebenezer Cemetery is located adjacent to the Ebenezer Methodist Church.  It is near the northern limit of Tull, AR, on State Highway 190.  GPS Coordinates: Latitude: 34.45072, Longitude: -92.57711. 

MARKING MOUNT HOLLY CEMETERY

From: DAILY RECORD July 02, 2012

L to R: Mary W. Glenn (3rd. VP National), Mary F. Duffey, (2nd. VP National)
Sheila Beatty (Arkansas State President) and Peggy Vandenburg (State Chairman)

Mount Holly Memorial Dedication for Veterans of the War of 1812

In celebration of the 200th Anniversary of The War of 1812, the Arkansas State Society, United States Daughters of 1812 (U.S.D.1812), recently marked the graves of 16 Veterans of the War of 1812 at Mount Holly Cemetery in Little Rock. Members of U.S.D.1812 attended from throughout the State as well as National Vice-Presidents from Oklahoma and Texas.

Also in attendance were direct descendants of three of the Veterans, representatives of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Arkansas Huguenot Society and the Board of Directors of Mount Holly. It is estimated over 60 people attended the event.

Major General William D. Wofford, The Adjutant General, Arkansas National Guard, gave the program. The Welcome to Mount Holly was given by the President of the Mount Holly Board of Directors, Kay Tatum. Captain Alan Tetkoskie, North Little Rock Fire Department, was the Piper. Soloist Isabella Romero, of Hot Springs Village, sang the National Anthem A Cappella. A luncheon followed at the Governor’s Mansion.

The 16 Veterans who were remembered were: William Lewis, Dr. William M. Totten, Dr. Mathew W. Cunningham , Peter Lefevre, John Hippsersley Crease, William F. Woodruff, Sr., William Savin Fulton, Roswell Beebe, George Izard, Isaac Watkins, Samuel Calhoun Roane, John Adamson, Nicholas Peay, Henry Keatts, John Giles and Francis M. McCann.

The Arkansas State Society has estimated that over 300 War of 1812 Veterans are buried in Arkansas and will attempt to locate the gravesites over the next three years of the Bicentennial.

Membership in the United States Daughters of 1812 is available to women age eighteen and over who can offer satisfactory proof that they are lineal descendants of an ancestor who, during the period of 1784-1815 inclusive, rendered civil, military, or naval service to our country, rendered material aid to the U.S. Army or Navy, or who participated in the Lewis and Clark Expedition.



 

Connecticutt:

Lee, Frederick

 

NEW YORK

Announcement: Marking for David Johnson

Oakland Rural Cemetery, the cemetery where Jan Johnpier's War of 1812 ancestor, David Johnson is buried, Notified Jan that the new head stone from the Department of Veterans Affairs had arrived. Marking is scheduled for Spring, 1813.

 

The monument of Col. John Mills, who was killed at the Battle of Sackets Harbor during the War of 1812. Mills body was buried with honors on the grounds of the Old New York State Capitol, but later transferred to the Albany Rural Cemetery. It is located close to the Soldiers' Lot on the North Ridge. The South Panel of the stone reads, “In memory of Colonel John Mills, born Jan. 25, 1782, killed at Sacketts Harbor, 29th May, 1813.’

NEW YORK

CEREMONY HONORS WAR OF 1812 SOLDIER

MOSES BACON

Ceremony honors veteran of War of 1812

War of 1812

The grave of Moses Bacon in Union Cemtery, Albion, was decorated in ceremonies Saturday by the Niagara Chapter of the Daughters of the War of 1812. Speaking are Jeanette Brooks, left front, president of the Chapter. At right are town of Gaines historian Dee Robinson, Orleans County historian Bill Lattin and State of New York president of the Daughters of the War of 1812, Jan Johnpier. Also shown are members of the 2nd squadron 101st Cavalry of the National Guard from Niagara Falls Air Force Base, who provided an honor guard. (Virginia Kropf/Daily News)

Posted: Tuesday, August 21, 2012 Published in the DAILY NEWS serving Genessee, Wyoming and Orleans (NY)

By Virginia Kropf news@batavianews.

ALBION — A veteran of the War of 1812 was honored in services Saturday at his grave in Union Cemetery.

Moses Bacon owned the farm on Route 98, just north of Albion, where Watt Farms is now located.

The cemetery is also on the property.

Elfreda Stangland of Albion, a member of the Niagara Frontier Chapter of the Daughters of the War of 1812, organized the event, which began at 11 a.m. at the Cobblestone Museum in Childs.

Welcoming remarks were given by Deborah Brundage, director of the Cobblestone Museum, and Jeanette Brooks, president of the Niagara Frontier Chapter, USD of 1812.

Colors were presented by the 2nd Squadron, 101st Cavalry from Niagara Falls Air Force Base, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance led by Jan Johnpier, president of the State of New York Society, USD of 1812.

Bagpiper Mo Britt of Lockport provided patriotic music at the Cobblestone Museum and during the grave marking ceremonies which followed in the cemetery.

While at the Museum, Lee Simonson, author of “Tuscarora Heroes,” presented a program on Western New York during the War of 1812.

Events at the cemetery included placing a wreath on Bacon’s grave by members of Boy Scout Troop 164 of Albion, and remarks by town of Gaines historian Dee Robinson and Orleans County historian Bill Lattin.

Robinson said the Watt farm was owned by Bacon and two brothers. After the war, Moses sold the east part to Hosea and the north part to Elias, reserving 100 acres for himself.

Moses moved to Albion from Connecticut about 1809. He joined the war effort in 1813, and in December 1814 he participated in the battle of Fort Erie, where he was shot in the neck and captured by the British. Moses was one of 1,000 prisoners captured on the Niagara Frontier and taken to Halifax Prison, where Robinson said he was treated poorly. Men slept in four-tiered hammocks and had no shoes or jackets.

Robinson also said Fort Erie was commanded by Gen. Edmond Pendleton Gaines, for whom the town of Gaines was named.

She showed a tiny carving from the Albion DAR’s museum, which Bacon carved while in prison. It was from the bone of a horse’s head, after the meat had been picked from it, she said.

Lattin explained the significance of monuments in honoring great people in our history.

“Moses Bacon was part of a great event in our nation’s history,” Lattin said. “It is fitting to honor this man who served his country.”

Lattin pointed out Bacon’s broken marker and said he was committed to see it was repaired.

After Brooks placed a War of 1812 marker on Bacon’s grave, a tea in his honor was served at Watt Farms.

 

 

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