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2013

President Jackson biographer marks Hermitage event

Posted: wnRenderDate('Tuesday, January 8, 2013 10:15 PM EST', '', true); Jan 08, 2013 9:15 PM CST <em Tuesday, January 8, 2013 10:15 PM EST Updated: wnRenderDate('Tuesday, January 22, 2013 10:15 PM EST', '', true); Jan 22, 2013 9:15 PM CST

HERMITAGE, TN (WSMV) -

Tuesday marks 198 years since the Battle of New Orleans, a fight many historians call the single most important in our nation's history.

Folks at The Hermitage, the home of President Andrew Jackson, marked the anniversary with music and a wreath laying.

The battle was the last major event in the War of 1812, during which the British attempted to regain control in North America, but Jackson was successful in heading them off.

Author John Meacham spoke at the event at Jackson's home and said Jackson was critical in the development of our country.

Meacham, who grew up in Chattanooga, on the Pulitzer Prize for his American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House.

"He's the most important and least understood figure in the middle of our history. He's the pivotal political figure in American life between Jefferson and Lincoln, and I really believe he was a key architect of the modern presidency," Meacham said.

Of course, Jackson, like just about any other prominent figure in American history, had his flaws, and Meacham said those controversial traits often reveal as much about a person as their accomplishments..

"You cannot mindlessly celebrate someone, because if you do, A: it's inaccurate, and B: they lose their capacity to teach. I learn a lot more from sinners than I do from saints," Meacham said.

The author signed copies of American Lion and his new book, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power.

In honor of the Battle of New Orleans, admission to The Hermitage was free Tuesday, and several visitors took advantage. Attendance was measured at more than 3,200 for the day, which officials said was a big increase over years past.

 

 

 

TENNESSEE SOCIETY DAUGHTERS OF 1812
PLACE BICENTENNIAL HISTORICAL MARKER ON
NATCHEZ TRACE PARKWAY
ON JUNE 16, 2012

 

 

Photos provided by Aline Gray Roberts Hon. VP National and Hon. TN State President

 

Bicentennial marker placed by Daughters of 1812


Posted: Friday, June 29, 2012 12:01 am

 

Bicentennial marker placed by Daughters of 1812 | Bicentennial marker placed by Daughters of 1812

Shown L to R: Program Speakers Dr. Ken Moore and Jack Walton, Hon. LA State President, Frances Jakes, TN State President Charlotte Miller, MC Aline Roberts, Hon. President National Shelby Ward, Cameron Sholly, Tony Turnbow, David Eagon and Lee Curtis.

The Tennessee State Society United States Daughters of 1812 dedicated an 1812 Bicentennial Historical Marker Commemorating the War of 1812 at “Old Trace” on the Natchez Trace Parkway, point 426.3, June 16 at 11 a.m.
The Trumpet Call was given by Eagle Scout Cameron Grady. The Color Guard was Franklin High School Jr. ROTC. The TN Volunteer Infantry, led by Jeff Brewer and men from Columbia gave a fire salute for the occasion.
The welcome was given by Honorary 2nd VP National and Honorary TN State President Aline Gray Roberts of Sharon.
The invocation was given by state chaplain Colleen Hankins Spears. The Pledge of Allegiance to USA flag was led by Linda Helton Tripp. The Salute to the Flag of 1812 was led by Honorary TN State President Joan Hill Hanks.
The Salute to the Flag of TN was led by Debra Maddox Wilson, state flag chairman. State Recording Secretary Olivia Bates Chandler, led the American’s Creed.
The National Anthem was sung by Park Ranger Daniel Kimes, who was in his 1812 uniform.
Lee Curtis, TN Department of Tourism of Franklin read a message from Gov. Bill Haslam.
Mrs. Roberts read a letter from President National N.S.U.S.D. Virginia Apyar.
Greetings were brought by National Society U.S.D. 1812 Honorary President National Shelby Dee Ward of Alabama and greetings were brought by Louisiana Honorary State President Frances Becton Jakes of Louisiana. TN State President Charlotte Miller also brought greetings.
Dr. Ken Moore, City of Franklin mayor, and Jack Walton, chair of the Williams County Commission, extended greetings.
Greg Snider, from the Leiper’s Fork community, brought greetings and asked all to come, eat and visit in the town stores after the program.
David Eagan, president of TN Society War of 1812, brought 1812 thoughts of today.
President of the Natchez Trace Parkway Association Tony L. Turnbow gave a tribute. He remarked, “Tennessee became known as the ‘Volunteer State’ during the War of 1812 when over 2,000 men answered the call for troops. Volunteer cavalry militia marched down the Natchez Trace in brutal winter conditions in January 1812 to help defend the Gulf Coast area against a threatened British attack. All 2,000 troops returned home in April 2012 led by General Andrew Jackson. On the return march, Jackson walked with his infantry all but 20 miles back to Tennessee. With food in short supply and disease spreading rapidly, soldiers died on the marches and were buried along the old Natchez Trace.
In 1814, detachments of soldiers again marched on the Trace to engage the Britishin the Battle of New Orleans. Over 5,000 Tennessee and Kentucky soldiers returned victorious from the 1815 battle. Towns along the Natchez Trace met returning soldiers with celebrations and illuminations, by placing candles in their windows. Jackson returned on the Trace in a carriage accompanied by his wife and son who had come to meet him. As Jackson neared Franklin, the citizens met and urged him to give a victory speech.
He summed up the war by stating, ‘Our rights will henceforth be respected.’ Sacrificing family and self, volunteer soldiers fought for country and freedom during the War of 1812, yet today lie on American soil in unmarked graves, forgotten.
The Tennessee U.S. Daughters of 1812 monument today will recognize the important role of the Natchez Trace in the War of 1812 and the soldiers who fought to establish American Independence.”
TN State Historical Landmarks Chairman Ruth Heizer gave recognition of the memorial site. State Third Vice President Miss Felicia Wilt unveiled the beautiful 1812 marker and read the words engraved in the stone.
Honorary Curator National and Honorary TN State President Bettie Parker Gustafson gave the dedication.
Cameron Sholly, superintendent of National Trace Parkway, accepted the marker. He said, “We are going to call this hillside site now – the 1812 Memorial site on the Natchez Trace Parkway.” How pleased the daughters were and surprised.
Page Miss Rachel Roberts, member of Tulip Grove Chapter, placed the 1812 wreath.
The benediction was given by Mrs. Spears. Jim Drury dressed in 1812 uniform, played “Amazing Grace” on bagpipes.
Published in The WCP 6.28.12

From Knox News.com

Daughters of 1812 participate in parkway dedication


Members of the General Henry Knox Chapter of the U.S. Daughters of 1812 in attendance at the dedication of the War of 1812 Bicentennial Historical Marker placed on the Natchez Trace Parkway are, from left, State Marking Chairman Ruth Heizer, Chapter Vice President Shirley Rouse, State President Charlotte Miller, Chapter President Shirley Rouse and State and Chapter Registrar Debra Wilson.

Members of the General Henry Knox Chapter, U.S. Daughters of 1812, participated in the dedication of the Tennessee State Society 1812 Bicentennial Historical Marker dedication at “Old Trace” on the Natchez Parkway. The marker is located near the point of General Andrew Jackson’s return from the Battle of New Orleans. General Jackson stated that the significance of the victory earned by the sacrifices of the original Tennessee Volunteers meant “Our Rights Will Henceforth Be Respected.” The June 16 dedication of the marker was the official beginning of the three-year-commemoration of the War of 1812 by the Tennessee Bicentennial Commission. Superintendent Cameron Sholly of the Natchez Trace Parkway announced that the Old Trace site would be the official War of 1812 Memorial on the Parkway.

Monday, June 18, 2012

Dedication of 1812 Bicentennial Marker

On Saturday, 16 June 2012, we were witnesses to the dedication of the 1812 Bicentennial Marker on the Natchez Trace Parkway. This was sponsored by the Tennessee State Society of the United States Daughters of 1812 who raised the funds. The marker is dedicated to all of the soldiers buried along the Old Natchez Trace during the War of 1812.

The marker, as is fitting, is placed near a section of the original Natchez Trace.

Mecca Caron, Brittany Wyatt and Deborah Glidden


Acceptance by Cameron Solly Superintendent of the Natchez Trace Parkway.
Jim Drury
The color guard from the Franklin High School ROTC
Tennessee Volunteer Infantry led by Capt. Jeff Brewer

1812 Soldier Honor Guard, organized by Daniel Kimes, takes a much needed break for water.

Bill Glidden and Capt. Brewer

The marker is located around mile 426 just south of Leipers Fork, Tennessee.
Take the time to pay homage the many men who are honored.

For more information on the commemorations for the War of 1812 in Tennessee go to

INSCRIPTION ON MONUMENT PLACED BY TENNESSEE SOCIETY

This monument memorializes War of 1812 Soldiers buried along the Old Natchez Trace and it honors the service of all brave volunteers who marched on the Natchez Trace during the War of 1812 to help establish American Independence. The Natchez Trace served as an important route to move troops for the defense of the Gulf Coast Region. Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry under the leaderhip of Andrew Jackson marched down the Natchez Trace to Natchez in January 1813. General Jackson marched with 185 soldiers on the their return April 1813. Soldier detachments under Jackson's command again marched on the Natchez Trace in 1814 and following the victory at the Battle of New Orleans, most of the Americans who fought the Battle of New Orleans returned on the Trace. Volunteers marched hundreds of miles, often in severe weather with little food and inadequate equipment. Natchez Trace Inns served as hospitals. Soldiers who did not survive the marches are buried in graves unmarked along the Trace. On General Jackson's return, near this point he proclaimed his view of the significance of the victory earned by the soldiers' sacrifices, 'OUR RIGHTS WILL HENCEFORTH BE RESPECTED."

Tennessee State Society United States Daughters of 1812

On the Bicentennial-June 16, 2012

Program and Photos submitted by Aline Roberts, Hon. 2nd. Vice President National
and Honarary State of TN president who served as MC and was responsible for organizing program

PROGRAM FOR HISTORICAL MARKER DEDICATION

Trumpet Call
 
Eagle Scout Cameron Grady
Color Guard
 
Franklin High School JROTC
Salute Fired
 
TN Volunteer Infantry led by J. Brewer
Welcome
 
Aline Roberts, Hon. TN State Pres.
Invocation
 
Colleen Spears, TN State Chaplain
Pledge of Allegiance
 
Linda Helton Tripp
Salute Flag of 1812
 
Joan Hanks, Hon. TN State Pres.
Salute Flag of Tennessee
 
Debra Wilson, State Flag Chairman
American Creed
 
Olivia Chandler, State Recording Secy
National Anthem
 

Daniel Kimes, Park Ranger

Posting Colors
 
Franklin High School JROTC
Message TN Governor
 
Lee Curtis, TN Dept. Tourism
Greetings
 
Shelby Dean Ward Hon Pres. National
Greetings
 
Charlotte Miller, TN State President
Greetings
 
Frances Jakes, Hon. LA State Pres.
Greetings
 
Dr. Ken Moore, Mayor of Franklin
Greetings
 
Jack Walton, Williamson Co. Commission
Greetings
 
Greg Sander Leiper's Fork Tourism
Tribute
 
Tony Turnbow, Pres. Natchez Trace Assoc.
Historical Landmarks
 
Ruth Heizer, State Chair Historical Markers
Markeer Unveiling
 
Rachel Roberts & Felicia Wilt TN 3rd. Vice
Dedication
 
Bettie Gustafson Hon. Curator General
Acceptance
 
Cameron Sholly, Supt. Trace Parkway
Wreath Placement
 
Rachel Roberts, Page, Tulip Grove Chapter
Benediction
 
Colleen Spears
Bagpipes Amazing Grace
 
Jim Drury
Retiring of Colors
 
Franklin High School JROTC
Retiring of 1812 Flag
 
Debra Wilson
Retiring Columbia Infantry
 
Jeff Brewer and men
Taps
 
Cameron Grady, Eagle Scout

 

Tony L. Trumball, President of the Natchez Trace Parkway Association, noted that Tennessee became known as "the Volunteer State" during the War of 1812 when over 2,000 men answered the call for troops. Upon Jackson's return after the Battle of New Orleans towns along the Natchez Trace met returning soldiers with celebrations and illumniations, by placing candles in windows. Jackson returned on the Trace in a carriage accompanied by his wife and son who had come to meet him. Statement:" Our rights will henceforth be respected" is quoted from a victory speech Jackson made to the residents of Franklin, Tennessee when he was urged to speak.

 

 

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